Site Logo
Looking for girlfriend > 40 years > 10 questions to ask your husband every week

10 questions to ask your husband every week

Site Logo

Journal , Relationships. Guys, it started with this post. The 4 questions to ask your kids each night. And then our writers came up with a list of 50 questions to ask your kids each night. And then they came up with 70 faith-filled questions for kids, too.

SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: What to look for in a life partner?

Content:
SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: 10 Things Every Wife Needs To Do For Her Husband

Ten Questions to Ask Your Spouse Every Weekend

Site Logo

When you've been married for a long time, it's easy to slip into a daily routine and familiar lifestyle and forget that you might not necessarily be meeting all of your partner's needs. Just because someone isn't vocalizing a complaint doesn't mean they don't have one, and the last thing you want is to be blindsided by divorce papers when you thought your marriage was going perfectly well.

If she no longer is talking about it, and a specific solution has not been implemented, she may be planning her exit. Now, no one is suggesting that you have a Big Relationship Talk every day—that would be exhausting. But it's important to check in every once in a while, if for no other reason that to show the other person how much they mean to you. And just so you don't have to go into this conversation blindly, here's a handy guide to the kinds of questions you should ask your spouse at least once a year.

And for secrets to marital bliss, check out the habits that experts say will increase your chances of divorce. We began having meaningful discussions on what we wanted from life and how we could make each other happier," he wrote.

His wife of thirty years, Jeannie, told Family Life Today that when her husband first asked this question, she "was almost blown away. It was wonderful. Whether it's finances or sexuality or differences, somebody is feeling dishonored. You might think you know your spouse inside and out, but the truth is that people change. Your partner might not be the same person now that they were when you first married them, so it's worth addressing if there are any significant differences between you two that makes the other person feel less heard or seen.

You'll notice that many of these questions begin with, "What could I do to…" rather than just, "Do you feel understood? This is another good one from Elliff. By the way, he emphasizes that you need to ask them one-by one instead of just printing them out like a list and handing to your spouse to fill out like a form. It's easy to take the little things that your spouse does for you for granted, and this question shows that you are aware of that and are actively trying to avoid this very human pitfall.

It's the atomic bomb of questions, but it's one you need to ask your spouse—and, honestly, yourself—every once in a while to make sure the answer is overall a "Yes. Not to be undone by her husband, Jeannie Elliff made her own list of questions that every wife should ask her spouse, and this is a particularly good one, as it ensures that you have the same vision for your future as a couple and are actively working towards it.

One of the best parts about those first few years of dating is the "long walk stage," where you, well, go on long walks and share your hopes and dreams.

But, once you've been married for some time, your spouse might be reticent to share dreams that seem financially risky or even outlandish. Asking this question will help you spouse know that their individual pursuits are still important to you, and the follow-up shows—before they even answer—that you're on their side. This is a nice, open-ended way of inviting your spouse to share concerns without any of the negative connotations of "What's wrong with our marriage?

But, if you've lost the spark in your marriage a bit, talking about the old times can also help you remember why you got together in the first place and infuse it into your current bond. It can be so helpful to talk about how often each partner would like to have sexual contact, what their understanding of fidelity is, and other ways of staying intimately connected when having a sexual experience just isn't in the cards. Phrasing the question this way leaves room for your spouse to explain their priorities in a way that seems theoretical as opposed to specific to your marriage, and may therefore make it easier for them to express how they really feel in a sort of roundabout way.

In a touching Reddit thread that went viral , an elderly widower wrote about how haunted he is by the memory of all the times his wife asked him if he wanted her to lose weight or if he still found her attractive, and how he wished that he had tried harder to make sure she always knew how much he loved her. Even if you don't get a substantive answer to this question, in some ways, the question itself is probably its own answer. People ask this a lot before they get married, but once they've walked down the aisle, it's easy to assume it's not necessary anymore.

However, it's important that your relationship continues to grow even after you've said your vows, and that you're both on the same page about what that means for you. As this viral Facebook post from proves , it's often the little things—like making your wife a cup of coffee in the morning or doing the dishes so she can watch her favorite TV show—that can make her feel truly appreciated and loved.

Like the "What's your idea of an ideal marriage" question, this provides your partner a chance to shed light on some of the things that might be lacking in your marriage without having to make it specific to you. As an added benefit, it can make it easier for them to realize what's bothering them or what they need more if they haven't quite figured it out yet. Don't assume you know your spouse's bottom line.

The reality is that some people know they could forgive, say, a one-night mistake, but couldn't get over the deception of a year-long affair. It's only fair that at least one of these questions would be a self-esteem booster, but this question also has a lot of practical value.

You've already asked about some of the things you're doing wrong that you should try to change, so why not find out what you're doing right so that you can amp that up? Don't believe it? All Rights Reserved. Open side menu button. It just takes one line to keep the flame alive.

By Diana Bruk January 25, Diana is a senior editor who writes about sex and relationships, modern dating trends, and health and wellness. Read more. Read This Next. Is it for you? Here's What Happened. Could a trance-like state really cure erectile dysfunction? A whopping 50 percent of men fail this basic biology test. Latest News. From the polo field to the yoga studio What to stream when you're feeling down. And it doesn't involve your purse or pants pocket. Smarter Living. Be careful the next time you reach for your wallet.

Your nose and mouth aren't the only entry points. This sleek new jet will rule the sky. Facebook Twitter Instagram LinkedIn.

22 Questions to Ask Your Spouse Once a Year

Ah, relationship beginnings. The stream of non-stop texting, the late-night conversations that will make you starry-eyed even into the next morning. Your daily conversations went from loving talk to logistical talk. Newlyweds vow that this will never be them. But too many couples become emotionally disconnected and they never saw it coming.

It felt a little strange at first, but over time it became part of our regular rhythm and it has paid off in huge ways for us personally. I would suggest these questions to anyone who is married to improve communication and the quality of your relationship with each other.

When you've been married for a long time, it's easy to slip into a daily routine and familiar lifestyle and forget that you might not necessarily be meeting all of your partner's needs. Just because someone isn't vocalizing a complaint doesn't mean they don't have one, and the last thing you want is to be blindsided by divorce papers when you thought your marriage was going perfectly well. If she no longer is talking about it, and a specific solution has not been implemented, she may be planning her exit. Now, no one is suggesting that you have a Big Relationship Talk every day—that would be exhausting. But it's important to check in every once in a while, if for no other reason that to show the other person how much they mean to you.

20 (Fun!) Questions to Ask Your Partner

It helped me realize how important it is to keep this time focused on having fun with each other, getting away from the stresses of life, and strengthening our emotional intimacy. Date night conversations should be light-hearted, positive, engaging, and focused on the present. And one of the best ways people try to accomplish this is through asking each other questions. What I mean is that married couples need questions that meet the following criteria: 1 the questions go beyond the basics that we should already know because those conversations can get dull and 2 they avoid questions that are too serious for date night because they have the potential to cause an argument. So Trevor suggested that I write a blog post of my own consisting of great conversational questions that were light-hearted and engaging! Ones that are perfect for married couples to ask on date night, road trips, or during any other quality time spent together! Cornhole is a great game to play while asking questions! Or this big version of Connect Four! Or even just while simply eating a yummy treat like this skillet cookie kit.

50 Fun Questions to Ask Your Partner To Get to Know Them Deeper

No time together? Like Glennon says,. Last week we talked about how to connect with your spouse for 10 minutes everyday. I did some more research on better questions to ask, and Rich and I have been experimenting in asking each other new questions at night when we talk. Sara Goldstein from Oddly Well Adjusted posting on parent.

Ditch the obligatory "How was your day?

Author's Note: This post needed some art. Instead of attaching stock photos of some random happy couple, I thought I would include a few shots of a happy couple I know personally. But just to keep things honest, know that we rarely pose for pictures on those days when things aren't quite so happy.

100 Conversational Questions to Ask Your Spouse

Recently, my husband, Marc, and I started testing out a new ritual. We are habit people and find that when we can put key aspects of our connection on autopilot — that is, we get them to happen without having to think too much about making them happen — we find each other more in the slightly chaotic, sometimes harried, often muddled, basket weave that is life. For over a decade, we've carved the habit of a weekly date night into our family blueprint, amassing a dugout of equally delightful and reliable babysitters and teaching our kids that mom and dad time is the norm, no different than morning breakfast or nightly tuck-ins. It's just what we do.

Communication, or lack thereof, is the root of all problems in marriages. If you have a hard time communicating with your partner, or even just want to take your marriage from great to outstanding, set aside some time each week to ask your husband these 10 questions. So simple, yet very rarely asked. Relationship expert April Masini states this is the most important question you can ask your spouse. Pull out the calendar and together discuss what each of you is doing for the week. Does he need to work late a few days?

10 Questions Happy Couples Are Constantly Asking One Another

I am an external processor and love to talk out loud. My husband is an internal processor and figures out almost everything in his head. This means that sometimes, in marriage, I feel like our conversations are one-sided. I have found that if I ask my husband pointed and direct questions he is happy to share and I feel like we are connecting on a deeper level. Is our marriage on track to still be in love in 10, 15, 20 years? If not, what can we do differently now to set us up to have and keep our happily ever after? Do you believe our children have and feel security based on our marriage?

Jan 28, - "I want you to know that I believe Elizabeth is having a tough time with your travel schedule, and I think it would be really good if you took her out.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Comments: 5
  1. Maladal

    I consider, that you are not right. I am assured. I can prove it. Write to me in PM, we will communicate.

  2. Kizilkree

    Between us speaking, in my opinion, it is obvious. I have found the answer to your question in google.com

  3. Kesida

    I confirm. I join told all above.

  4. Nikinos

    It is the amusing information

  5. Zolozil

    I apologise, but I need absolutely another. Who else, what can prompt?

Thanks! Your comment will appear after verification.
Add a comment

© 2020 Online - Advisor on specific issues.